How did the Green Revolution Begin in India and Who Sowed its Seed

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The Green Revolution was launched in India in the year the 1960s to address the issue of malnutrition in the developing world and the initiation of high-yielding qualities of seeds and the associated farming techniques.

The term “Green Revolution” was used for the improvement of agricultural practices which start in Mexico in the year the 1940s. After its big success in terms of producing more agricultural products there, Green Revolution technologies adapted worldwide in the year between the 1950s to 1960s.

The technology of the Green Revolution included bio-engineered seeds that worked in combination with chemical fertilizers and heavy irrigation to improve crop yields. The technology was quickly utilized in many states in India and for some was a great success.

The government of India post-independence willing to make India self-dependent in the process of production of food grains and these efforts matched with the development of high-yielding types of seeds of wheat produced by “Norman Borlung” and his allies in Mexico. These seeds also required changes in agricultural techniques such as the addition of fertilizers and pesticides and more prominent use of irrigation.

High-yielding types of seeds were first introduced in India in the states of Punjab, Haryana, and sections of western Uttar Pradesh.

The green revolution did efficiently solve India’s problem of food-grain deficiency after it was introduced in India, although in the second wave of the Green Revolution in the 1980s, there was, however, a small decrease in production as opposed to the first wave.

Green Revolution in India began with lots of promise and made tremendous contributions in increasing agricultural productivity with high-yielding seeds and the initiation of new methods of agriculture in India, its quality is somewhat disappearing in modern times.

Many scholars are in favor of the Green Revolution as a benefit to India’s agricultural production, some scholars also hold opposing views against the Green Revolution.

Plant Technologies of the Green Revolution

The crops grown through the Green Revolution were high yield varieties – in the simple term, they were trained plants developed specifically to respond to fertilizers and produce an increased amount of grain per acre farmed.

During the Green Revolution, plants that had the highest seeds were picked to create the most of the production possible. After selectively growing these plants, they developed to all have the characteristic of larger seeds.

These larger seeds then produced more grain yield and heavier above-ground weight. By increasing the seed or food part of the plant, it was able to use photosynthesis more efficiently because the energy generated through this process passed directly to the food portion of the plant.

How Green Revolution started in India

The “Green Revolution” in India started in the year of mid-1960s considering a change from traditional agriculture in India and the start of high-yielding varieties of seeds and the associated agricultural methods.

The need for including the Green Revolution in India happened due to a lack of food-grains in part due to the legacy of the colonial administration.

The government of India post-independence ready to make India self-dependent in terms of food-grain production and these efforts matched with the growth of high-yielding types of seeds of wheat produced by Norman Borlung and his associates in Mexico.

These seeds also required changes in agricultural techniques such as the increase of fertilizers and pesticides and more prominent use of irrigation. High-yielding types of seeds were first launched in India in the states of Punjab, Haryana, and parts of western Uttar Pradesh.

The green revolution did effectively solve India’s difficulty of food-grain deficiency after it was introduced in India, although in the second wave of the Green Revolution in the 1980s.

The scholars often cite the unfavorable environmental effects of the resources employed in developing high-yielding varieties of seeds such as fertilizers and pesticides for example as well as criticize certain socio-economic impacts of the Green Revolution in India such as social struggle due to a thriving socio-economic divide.

Although the Green Revolution in India started with great hope and made tremendous contributions in increasing agricultural productivity with high-yielding seeds and the introduction of new ways of agriculture in India, its quality is somewhat disappearing in modern times.

During the Green Revolution, plants that had the highest seeds were picked to create the most of the production possible. After selectively growing these plants, they developed to all have the characteristic of larger seeds.

These larger seeds then produced more grain yield and heavier above-ground weight. By increasing the seed or food part of the plant, it was able to use photosynthesis more efficiently because the energy generated through this process passed directly to the food portion of the plant.

Features of Green Revolution

  1. Proposed High Yielding Variety of seeds in Indian agriculture.
  2. The HYV seeds were very useful in regions that had rich irrigation facilities and were more strong with the wheat crop. Therefore, the Green Revolution at first concentrated on states with better infrastructure such as Tamil Nadu and Punjab.
  3. During the second phase, the high-yielding variety seeds were given to different states, and crops other than wheat were also involved in the plan.
  4. The most important element for the high-yielding variety seeds is proper irrigation. Crops grown from HYV seeds need good quantities of water supply and farmers could not dependent on monsoon. Hence, the Green Revolution has increased the irrigation systems around farms in India.
  5. Industrial crops and cash crops such as cotton, jute, oilseeds, etc. were not a part of the plan. The green revolution in India mainly featured food grains such as wheat and rice.
  6. To improve farm productivity green revolution improved the availability and use of fertilizers, weedicides, and pesticides to reduce any harm or loss to the crops.
  7. It also helped in promoting industrial farming in the country with the introduction of machinery and technology like harvesters, drills, tractors, etc.
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